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What A Difference A Fish Makes!

Meet Lumineon, formerly known as “Petrie”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who knew that a fish, of all things would be just what Dr. Mom ordered?

B’s birthday was on the 12th, and his grandparents gave him $10 to spend HIS way. So, he thought about it, and knowing that the girls were saving for a hamster, he wanted a pet too. And I thought that between the three, they were going to break me. Because, whatever the $10 did not cover, Dad and I would have to make up the difference.

To my surprise (and relief) B said he wanted a Tetra Beta fish. He’s been actually bugging hinting towards having a fish for a while now. But it really picked up steam once he had received money for his birthday. So, seeing as his older and younger sister had saved up enough of their money from chores, and he had his birthday money, a-shopping we did go!

My husband went downstairs to the fish department with B, as I stayed upstairs with his sisters. The guys (as usual) were done WAY before us ladies were. But everyone was happy when we left the pet store.

After Dad set up Lumineon in his bowl and placed him back in to B’s room, the next morning, I’d found something that my son had written. Something that kind of had taken me aback.

A *reminder* note! No one told him to do so. He had thought of this on his own.

Basically, it was stating to feed his fish in the morning and evening with 3 or 4 food pellets.

So far, so good, too. He has been doing well to remind me to feed him if he couldn’t, or to feed Lumineon himself. Let’s just say, we have a VERY happy Tetra Fish.

Oh, and as for the name? Petrie (pee-tree) was initially the name. For one thing, it made sense. The other was that it was easily stated. But, of course the boy just had to switch it on me. And being the Pokemon nut that he is, why was I even surprised at this? Because apparently, the fish is the same colors (blue and red) as some Pokemon that is named “Lumineon”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And I honestly HATE typing the name out too, because my fingers get tongue-tied and I cannot for the life of me, get the name spelled straight on the first try. But I will have to admit, that the Pokemon version of Lumineon is cute.

In the end, having a fish called Lumineon is teaching my son, who usually is one to pass off responsibility to others, and not take ownership of pretty much anything, that HE is responsible for HIS pet, and it’s proper care. And it is teaching him about ownership, not just of a living creature, but that he must take ownership of his own actions and decisions, and of his own things. Plus, B seems to be more focused with tasking than before Lumineon came in to his life.

Thanks, Lumi (my short nick-name for the little guy) for helping my son see the true value of being a responsible, honest and reliable person in his community, and within his home. You have accomplished what most “experts”, and even us as his parents have failed in doing. He may have his “quirks”, but now, we have you. And you, my friendly fish, are showing him the way to being the kid I know he can be, and you are helping to let his full potential shine through.

Special Needs Parent of the Month (February, 2012)

Welcome to the “Special Needs Parent of the Month” post, where MONTHLY, I will feature a Special Needs Parent. If you are interested in being considered as a featured SN parent in a future posting, please email me at melmom2angels@yahoo.com.

This month’s parent is Holly. She is a sweet, very energetic, hilarious and a bit of a potty-mouth (LOL!) lady. She wears her heart on her sleeve. And she has a pretty full plate. In her own words, she will tell of herself, her family, and her life with having a disabled child.

This is Brooke.

She’s my fourth child, my second daughter, and the only one born with an extra chromosome….

Brooke has Down Syndrome.

But please, don’t feel badly for me-or for her. Don’t make that cutesy smile and give me a look of pity mixed with wonder at how I do, especially with four other children…

Because Brooke? Is absolutely fantastic and a joy to have in our family…

I’m not going to pretend she’s exactly like our other children, because she’s not…

There is a developmental delay with Brooke. We just had an evaluation last week and she’s about 6-9 months behind her typical peers…not horrible, but still something that needs to be addressed so that Brooke can the best life possible…

So we do therapy. Brooke has physical therapy once a week for an hour, and occupational therapy and speech therapy twice a week for 30 minutes each. Is it a pain in the butt? Sometimes. Is it inconvenient? Sure, there are days I’d like to not plan around it…but we love Brooke, and we want her to thrive…so we go…

And Brooke loves it! She gets a kick out of people applauding for her, in fact, she expects it now no matter what task she does, so getting constant attention and love for doing puzzles or pointing out pictures in a book is right up that chunky girl’s alley!

But life isn’t all about therapy and trying to make her better…I’m a firm believer in letting her be a regular child.

Brooke plays with her brothers and sister. She pushes her babies around the stroller. She throws the ball. She colors on the walls. She claps and dances along to The Wiggles. She gives hugs and kisses. She throws her lunch at the wall when she’s not happy with what I’ve made.

Brooke is more like your child than different…

So what if she’s going to need a little bit more help learning? So what if she doesn’t have as many words as your kid does right now?

Brooke will catch up…

And we’re going to do anything we can to help her have an amazing life…

Because she’s worth it.

I’m a shameless self promoter by the way…read my blog at Holly’s House-Not a Perfect Mom’s Blog and check me out on my FACEBOOK LIKE PAGE too. And if you really love me, follow me on twitter. And uh, I hate to admit it, but I have a Google + page too #hangsheadinshame. Warning: I have a potty mouth….

Special Needs Parent Monthly (#1)

Welcome to the kick off of a NEW blog series, where MONTHLY, I will feature a Special Needs Parent. If you are interested in being considered as a featured SN parent in a future posting, please email me at melmom2angels@yahoo.com.

First up is Robin. In her own words, she will tell of herself, her family, and her life with having a disabled child.

basic info….stay at home mom, married 16 years in Feb., I enjoy reading, photograghy and word games.

have 2 sons Derek 11 and Jacob 13..

life as a special needs parent well, I don’t sleep much lol. it’s a struggle to balance my time between my sons since Jacob needs so much of my time. Jacob was dxed at 2 years, he was a good baby, well a great baby…only cried when he was hungry. Everyone was jealous but in the back of my mind I was worried. He was To good! He didn’t regress, he just reached milestones late. He didn’t babble, point, or “play” like other kids his age. He started PT at 8 months, Ot and speech at 18 months and early intervention at 2.

He is in the 8th grade and I’m going to start home schooling next because he will be going into high school and I feel like he will benefit more from one on one and I can pay more attention to the areas that of important to Jacob. He LOVES music, football, water, and food. lol which is a challenge because he is on the gf/cf diet.

He’s a good dancer. He has severe IBS and when he is in pain he becomes very aggressive. He doesn’t know his own strength. He gives the best hugs in the world! He has a lot of sensory issues and likes deep pressure and massage.

He likes to be petted on his arms some times which gets us strange looks in public. lol Doesn’t bother me, I’m outspoken if people are rude I let them know about it.

Autism is just part of our family….you learn to adjust your life accordingly. Jacob is non verbal so I am his voice….and I have a big mouth (hehe)!

"Invisible No More" (video)

Take a journey with these people and their stories of having hidden/invisible disabilities of varying degrees and ailments.

This is an introduction to those that have been willing to come to the forefront and be the “face” of the Peoples with Invisible Disabilities Community.

Pete Monfre

Lauri Cohen

Andrea Fabry

**DISCLAIMER;**

I own NOTHING. These videos are provided through a YouTube channel for the Invisible No More Organization. And are solely for educational purposes, only.

If You Are A Parent Who is Being *Abused* By Your Kids…

First of all, know you aren’t alone with being physically ABUSED… yes, abused, by your child. I have been verbally, emotionally abused, assaulted and my life threatened. All by my child.

It had taken me a long time to accept the fact that I was being abused by my own child. When you are left with marks or scars because of your children’s actions, or you have things pulled out on you (like knives, hammers and scissors), and have your very LIFE IT’S SELF *threatened* and/or in jeopardy, that is constituted by law as ABUSE. Even if it’s by a minor child.

As for medications (no matter the reason for taking them), if you have stopped them, YES, you have to let the doctor know. Tell them exactly why you did it. They have to know for various reasons. That goes for ANY doctors that have taken charge of taking care of your child medically! They base what is being taken as to if they can use other meds for other reasons as to ensure that there isn’t any deadly mixings/cross medicatings.

If your child is getting so out of hand, no matter if just at home, both there and at school, or both of them AND within community settings (restaurants, the store, etc.), that behavior modifications (like a reward system and punishment system) are not working, then it MAY BE time to start thinking about ADD/ADHD (if they have it, too) medications and even Mood Stabilizers (like the Seroquel that B is on).

As for DENIAL that something is truly wrong with our kids, and the fact that they need more help than we can give on our own, we ALL go through it. Especially us moms of children such as ours. But also, you have to look at it from THEIR perspective, too.

Our kids do NOT want to be “bad” kids who are different in that view of them. All in all, they ARE *good* kids, but have brains that are hardwired completely different from their peers and from most other people in general.

Medications for the mentally unstable, for KIDS, has gotten SO many bad “reports”. Mainly from those that have NEVER even tried them, and are unwilling to try them for their children as a part of their overall therapy.

True, not every child NEEDS to be medicated. But, most of the time, the ones that NEED it, don’t get it, and the ones that DON’T need it, are the ones being “doped up”.

In the end, the ONLY ones that can determine for certain that your child needs medications that will help with their mental issues is you, the doctor in charge of your child’s care (Psychiatrist) and the child (more so their overall mental state).

Yes, I know that dealing with the agencies and doctors, and therapists CAN be a pain in the butt, in the end, it makes life SO much easier, when what SHOULD HAVE ALREADY been done IS being done.

Easier for them and their day-to-day life, and for US as their parents as well.

Kids and Adults. See the Difference.

Yesterday, my son had a Psychiatric appointment. While in the waiting room, a girl not too much younger than him came in. I knew RIGHT OFF THE BAT she has a moderate/severe form of Autism. She mainly played “alone” away from the group of kids at the table (including my 3 kids). But in the end, two of mine went and played with her, as did another little boy.

In that moment, I had seen firsthand how CHILDREN are more accepting and less afraid of communication and interaction with another person, despite being profoundly disabled, in contrast to the *adults* who are TOO SCARED (as in may say or do something “wrong” within the interaction process) to interact with them.

These kids all had something in common in that room. THAT is what drawn them to one another. The fact that they ALL are disabled, mentally in one way or another, you *can’t* see OUTSIDE (for the most part) what their handicaps are. But they all understand one another and eachother’s “quirks”.

If only more people, primarily adults could be like those kids. To see PAST an individual’s “quirks” (disabilities) and interact with them on a more personal level of “normalcy” and compassion. To do so would make this world a MUCH better place to live.

Just like my son and his older sister. They can fight and scrap like cats thrown in to a tub of water and getting a bath. But when push comes to shove, my oldest (the girl) says that NO ONE had better DARE call her little brother names (like retard) or pick on him in any other way. She said if they do and she finds out, the bully will be dealing with HER…Same with my son about BOTH of his sisters.

My daughters SEE and also have experienced firsthand what their brother’s differences are and can be like, from other “normal” kids (and boys his age). But they are accepting of him for who he is, and what his “quirks” are.

They know when to run and hide, when to stand up to him and when to defend him. In the end, he is their brother. Period. Not disabled, weird, different or “nuts in the head”.

Just a kid that is a bit off, but is still lovable just the same and is treated no differently.

Views Of the Disabled Around the World

The following videos are ones I was able to “find” in regards to how those around the world view and are treated that have various disabilities. And personally, the last video is the most profound.

Kenya…

India…

Botswana…

Philippines…

Liberia…