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Judgment

Those of you that have a child with Special Needs knows exactly what I speak of.

It can be judgment from a stranger (most usual form). Or from a friend. Judgment can happen even with families.

Judgment is defined as… (via dictionaryreference.com)

noun

1.

an act or instance of judging.
2.

the ability to judge, make a decision, or form an opinion objectively, authoritatively, and wisely, especially in matters affecting action; good sense; discretion: a man of sound judgment.
3.

the demonstration or exercise of such ability or capacity: The major was decorated for the judgment he showed under fire.
4.

the forming of an opinion, estimate, notion, or conclusion, as from circumstances presented to the mind: Our judgment as to the cause of his failure must rest on the evidence.
5.

the opinion formed: He regretted his hasty judgment.
    The type of judgment that we are talking about today is within the definition of choice numbers ONE, and of FOUR.
    Although, the basis of judgment more often than not, is primarily upon choice number ONE.
    Because most “outsiders” will not know (even within the family circle) TRULY what life is like for our children, or for us as their parents and their caregivers.
    My son, even at almost eleven years old, is a “safety risk”. He has no “I better be certain it is safe” button. He has a “‘wow, that’s cool and I want to go to it’ button”. He can only see what he wants. Not what it takes to get it. Including safety. I worry every time he wants to walk to school (which is not even five minutes from my home). Mainly because the section of road we live on is high-traffic early in the morning. But I have to let him be independent. If I see him crossing the street in the wrong manner, then after school, when he gets home (via the bus), we have (yet another) talk about safety when crossing the street.
    I have had him walking with us in the mall, and he suddenly is far back behind, because something caught his eye and he ran off to check it out.
    Because of things like that, and because of an incident at a huge Theme Park, over in the water area, I for a good while used harnesses on my child. I never have had to do so with the two girls. But then again, they don’t have the problems that he does, and they are really good about listening, staying close and asking to check something out or to go somewhere.
     The times that I have used the harness, be it a wrist one, or one that straps around the chest and over the head, I have gotten “the look” of disgust and judgment. And I say, KEEP ON JUDGING! You have no idea about my child. You don’t know the dangers he can get in to. You have no clue as to how fast he can honestly be.
      To judge ANY parent, based solely on what you see, and nothing on what is known (which in most cases you don’t due to not knowing the people at all), to me is demeaning and rude. And it’s something that sadly, millions of us mothers and fathers must endure every single day. Because people just don’t understand. Some don’t WANT to understand. Some cannot begin to. Not until they sadly have a situation like I have had. And we aren’t talking about a grocery store or a neighbor’s house.
      My son ran off from us at a Theme Park that has a Water Park built in. We were in the section of the Water Park for the younger kids, playing laughing. Back then, my youngest was a baby. About eight months old at the time. In one moment, when both my husband and I turned for a brief second, he was gone. We called and called for him, only to find him nowhere. That’s when panic set in. Next thing I know, we have Park Security, ourselves and a couple of strangers helping us to look for my son.
       Thankfully, he was found (by Dad) not too far off, in the other section, waiting for the huge bucket to dump water on them (Dad took him there a bit before and played with him and had the bucket splash them). He wanted to go back to the bucket area, but told no one, and just took off. He just got it in his head that he wanted to go back, but forgot the step to get his wish. Instead, he (literally) ran with the thought and took off.
        Hence why the next year, we placed him in a strap harness. It helped us, and it kept him safe. Back then, if it were on the wrist, he surely would have been slick and removed it, only to jet off to God knows where. It was a safety tool. Not an abusive parenting tactic. Abuse would be to NOT do it, and let him run off to anywhere he felt led. With no worry of what COULD happen to him. That’s abusive.
         These days, we are no longer using the harnesses. But I tell you what… IF there EVER came a time to need one, you can safely bet that I WILL indeed use one on him. It’s better than him being kidnapped and have unimaginable speaks of horror possibly done to him. My child is TOO trusting and has no boundaries where his social interactions and self are concerned. So, he is an easy target. Personally, I refuse to take that chance. Even at his age.

At almost eleven years old, even a wrist harness may be embarrassing for him to wear, and for us to have to use it. We will I’m sure get nasty stares and a few finger points and snickers. But it’s worth it when I KNOW my son is safe.

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"ADHD isn’t *anything* but a myth."

This dude’s nothing but a crock of crap! He is NOT a certified Medical Doctor (and actually ADMITS to such claim). And apparently, so is Depression. It’s a “moral dilemma”. The ADHD is an “imaginary” medical condition according to this dummy.

Ones like this asshat has NEVER had children most likely. Or never had kids with these disorders.

Medication Station… To Transfer Or Not. That Is The Question.

There went that idea. At least for another 2 weeks. I wanted to transfer B.’s meds to the store that my husband works at, seeing as Walgreen’s dropped my girls and their insurance plan.

Although his IS safe, at least for another year, I don’t like the idea of having everyone all over town with their meds. I called the store’s pharmacy (Kroger), and sure enough (like back when he WAS with them), they have NONE of the Vyvanse in his strength requirement (top dose of 70 mg).

So, this means filling again with Walgreen’s, calling Kroger in 2 weeks to ensure that they place the Vyvanse at that dose on order to come in, in time for us to fill it.

You would think though, being it’s one of the MOST WIDELY used drugs for ADHD, in all of the available strengths, that it would ALWAYS be on hand.

I have some thinking to do over the next couple of weeks over this and mull the decision over.

To me, it’s just plain common sense to keep in stock, the drugs that you as a Pharmacist knows are of popularity in prescribing. To do otherwise, could cause you to lose customers or (potential) ones. And what if the person was to have ran out before you can get more in? That COULD have deadly consequences.

On The Merry-Go-Round We Go!..Again.

Well, another appointment has come and gone. Another one minus his Case Manager. THIS time, due to a death in the family.

First of all, we talked about B.’s medications and his eating “habits” of BARELY eating. Especially since again, he has lost weight and is showing the visible signs of it.

So, the doctor and I have decided to cut back some on his Vyvanse by 20 mgs. I will be placing the contents of the entire capsule in to a glass of water, pour out 2 ounces of a 7 oz. glass, then have him drink the other 5 oz. of water to consume 50 mg. of the medicine. I should know in a couple of weeks of doing this if it was the right move.

As for the Seroquel and the Intuniv, they are staying at the same dose of 50 mg. and 2 mg. amounts.

If push comes to shove, I will strongly consider a drug that is used in cancer patients to induce hunger and the wanting to eat. This would hopefully counter the unwillingness to eat and help him gain his weight and proper amount of muscle mass back.

His spinning/walking backwards is apparently a compulsive problem. He does this a lot. Like in Sears and the mall, where he almost knocked some things over and almost hit in to people.

And I found out that the noises and the sniffling (constantly most times) is a couple of tics that he has developed. But I cannot say for certain that it is medication-induced, or brain-induced tics. I think that at the next appointment in April (or was that March?), I will ask about that.

Also, his nose bleeds have been more active.

The highlight to all of this? He hasn’t been getting in to AS MUCH trouble in school as of late, with his behavior. Homework and attention? Still not that great. But we are working on it.

The Perfect Night That Wasn’t

Last night’s trip to the mall was an embarrassment. Even Dad had a hard time with B. My oldest wanted to go to a few shops with her Christmas money. So we made it a (supposed to be) nice family outing. Dinner at Golden Corral and then the River Ridge Mall.

Even the restaurant thing kinda went downhill. But the mall trip was worse.

At the restaurant, he would barely sit in his seat, was boisterous and loud. He while in a happy mood at the time (which I AM thankful for) notably bothered certain surrounding customers with his “antics”. It was almost like the viewing of things to come. And that was the MILD part of the evening.

Like I said, the mall was FAR worse.

He was running around, trying to get (way) too far ahead of us, walking BACKWARDS or spinning as we walked in the semi-crowded areas of the mall.

As we were ending our night in Sears, where we had initially parked, anyways, it was BAD. Constantly handling things, running in to and hiding in racks, running off and “escaping” down in to other areas of the general area that I was at.

It got so bad in Sears, that at one point, I grabbed him by his shirt collar and held on for dear life. Of course then I was “choking” him and he was almost yelling for me to let go. I am SOOO thankful that barely a customer was in that area.

He also tried to go out the “merchandise pick up” door just off from the girls/baby section. And of course, I stayed there with him and the older one, who was still shopping as Dad took the younger one to use the toilet.

I honest cannot say what got in to him to be so freaking high strung. But good Lord, I was sure that someone was gonna call CPS on me for “man handling” my kid as a means to corral him.

Oh! And he almost knocked over a couple of displays or hit people as he walked backwards AND spinning. Both in Sears and in the mall area its self.

It was just a washout of an evening. All thanks to one kid and his actions. What was meant to be a NICE family outing, turned in to a chaotic nightmare for all (as in the two sisters and myself and Dad).

*Vent over*

Spanking a Disabled Child vs Not Spanking & Punishment In General; SN vs NT Kids

I’m a spanking parent. I have spanked my son as needed through the years. Of course, he is of an age and height that I have been able to find other means of punishment (like taking toys/games/computer time away). But the youngest who is 7 years old, though a rare thing, still gets spanked IF the “punishment fits the crime”.

I have a friend on FaceBook who had been faced with a dilemma. Her child is three years old, disabled, and has yet to be diagnosed with Autism or any other mental delays. The other day at a family function, her husband had spanked their daughter for BITING, as well as hitting. And not a child, but another adult.

Her husband works a lot at his second shift job and only really sees the child on the weekends.

Mom isn’t much on spanking, but Dad is. And when the little girl bit and hit the adult, the Dad got a hold of his daughter and spanked her for her actions. Needless to say, Mom wasn’t pleased with how he handled the situation. She said it was more about the embarrassment of it happening in front of the family than anything else.

After hearing (or shall I say, reading) everything, I stated that the Mom can’t really be mad at him. If he isn’t able to be there due to working a lot, then he hasn’t had the time (or maybe even the energy) to be TAUGHT (by her) of what works best with their daughter. You cannot just “assume” he SHOULD know how to help handle her, when he isn’t there a lot of the time to learn by watching, listening or hands-on.

She needs to (calmly) approach him when they are BOTH free to get together, and talk with him and teach him what works best with your child. If she doesn’t take the time to voice to him what works/doesn’t work, then he won’t know the BEST options of how to punish/redirect/handle his child.

In time, she will learn the differences of when it’s her daughter just being a typical kid getting in to trouble, and between it REALLY being the disability showing through.

But even for as long as I have known the lowdown on my kid, I STILL have moments of wondering which way it is really swinging. In the end though, I try really, REALLY hard to NOT use the “he is disabled and has a lot of problems” excuse with him.

He is treated, talked to, and (most of the time) interacted with on the same level as his sisters. As in, he gets in to trouble just as much as they do.

I don’t let my kid use his disabilities as an excuse 100% of the time. If I do/did, then HE would think that he can get out of trouble ALL of the time.

To me, he is just as “normal” as his nutty sisters are. He is just more matter-of-fact and sensitive emotionally than the girls.

I sometimes get HIGHLY embarrassed due to my son’s actions, reactions and behaviors. No doubt. But even then, you cannot always “excuse” their behavior on their disabilities.

You have to learn and KEEP a balance between typical kid and disabled kid. Or else, they WILL grow up to think that they can (some literally) get away with murder.

And don’t EVER be embarrassed to defuse a situation (such as biting and hitting someone) in front of others. I have done it on many occasions and WON’T be afraid to do so in the future, if need be.

You just need to find that balance, and the key to successful behavior management where child’s concerned. Because they are unique individuals, and what works for me or any of the other parents, may not necessarily work for YOUR child, and you BOTH as their parents. There MUST be a middle ground that is firmly established.

Believe me when I say that I have had to (literally) peel my son off of one of his sisters as he bit them and used them for a punching bag. Seriously injuring the baby when she WAS a baby (bruises and a bonked head from being shoved off a toddler bed). Over NOTHING at all. Just got it in himself to start beating the holy hell out of her.

I don’t care if a person spanks or not. When it comes to hitting and biting, you MUST take care of the problem RIGHT THEN. Not later in the day. Be it if the child is one year old or 15 years old. Biting and hitting, especially an adult, or a child YOUNGER than the one doing the hitting/biting, is a huge “no-no” that has NO excuses.

In that instance, wrong is wrong. No matter the reason. No matter the mental capacity. No matter if the child is “normal” or “disabled”.

My philosophy is, if my “normal brained” girls are NOT allowed to behave in a certain manner (hitting, biting, stealing, cursing), then neither is my “mentally challenged” son.

How is honestly fair for me to excuse the actions of the one, and not of the two? That can and will build up resentment in his sisters against their brother, and against me if I was to excuse everything on the basis of his diagnoses.

Every single day it is indeed a struggle to find THAT balance between “normal childhood” behavior, and “disability-driven” behaviors. Some things though, should be no-brainer behaviors that no matter the mental capacity, should NEVER be tolerated or excused due to said disability.

And like a fellow group member had stated, not everything will work with everyone, nor will everyone believe that corporal punishment should be utilized. I say if used CORRECTLY and in the right situations, it CAN be an effective tool.

But not every offense deserves having a spanking. Just like not every offense deserves a month-long grounding.

I think a lot of my views stem from my own childhood. I WAS a disabled child. And my dad treated me as a normal kid. My mom on the other hand “babied” me. And she did it so much, to such an extent, that it really did tarnish my childhood, and made me resent her later on in life, for YEARS. Even after she died.

There is a time to use the “disability card” (my name for it), and when NOT to. Most times, it was just me being a kid. But to her, I did NO wrong, even when it was clear that I WAS in the wrong. So, I never got in trouble (if I did by her, it was VERY rare) unless my dad was there. And then, I got what he felt I deserved. Yes, that did include a spanking here and there.

The more I recall it all, and the more I think on it, I truly believe I got myself in to trouble, especially around my dad as much as I did, was because I THRIVED on it. I felt like a “normal” little kid.

Psych. Appt. Update..

All went well. We will work on organizational skills in regards to B’s homework and school bag/folders. As well as making certain he brings his Agenda home, WITH his assignments written in so we can initial them as he gets them done each day.

The doctor is pleased that I was able to take B off of his Seroquel (I did it on my own, without doctor’s permission, seeing as the dr. knew I would eventually decide when to try) with POSITIVE results in his mood (especially in the mornings) and sleeping/waking pattern. I no longer struggle in the mornings with him and his having nasty mood swings, or having him OVER sleep on the weekends, also with bad results.

He is still on his two ADHD medications. Vyvanse in the morning and the Intuniv at bedtime. Highest dose possible for the Vyvanse, still, and the 2 mg. dose out of possible 3 for the Intuniv.

Next appointment will be in January. And yes, the Case Manager was there and was instructed by the doctor to HELP with me getting him to better organize and to check in frequently with us as a family.

Case Manager “funny”… We told her how B’s been doing in school. We mentioned his two C’s for NOT turning in his homework and that we are taking steps to correct the problem. She interjects with “be sure to praise him when he does something right” when I mentioned that B said he was NOW turning in his homework.

Right then and there, I and my husband BOTH cut her off with a look of shock I think. We said that we DO praise him. But I refuse to let my child try to turn the tables and change the subject as to get out of getting in to trouble for his lack of responsibility with HIS homework.

Her eyes got big when we said that while we are glad he IS “turning it in now”, as B stated, we aren’t going to ALWAYS use the “5 positives for 1 negative” rule.

Funny. She rarely sees my son, calls to check up on him and us, and only really has us sign papers. I don’t see that as qualifying to TELL ME what I “need” to do. If she were involved more with him and with us on a more personal level (calling, coming for home visits, etc.), then I would see it differently.